Reviews - Khatyn by Ales Adamovich

Reviews - Khatyn by Ales Adamovich

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“The quiet art of Khatyn is the illumination, properly fitful and uncertain, of wartime Belarus, of the darkness of the twentieth century. The reader, like the protagonist, like the writer, cannot look away.”
Times Literary Supplement


“Still, Khatyn is an important book that deserves a place on the shelves of anyone fascinated by the history of World War II. It’s definitely not for the faint of heart, though. It’s the kind of book that gives you nightmares, and when you wake up and realize you were only dreaming, you cry for those for whom the burning agony was a reality.”
DIARY OF AN ECCENTRIC literary blog


“This book is probably not for very sensitive readers but if you think you can deal with all of the bad things in the book, it is most definitely worth the read.”
A BOOKISH AFFAIR literary blog

“Adamovich is definitely a humanist. His work is not meant solely to depress or enrage us. True, we must never forget the horrors of our past, and we must be on constant guard against forces that would create new horrors (the latter point is emphasized in the novel by the Boky discussions). But in so doing we must live on as humans ourselves.”
LOGOMORPHOSES BLOG

“Glagoslav Publications released a special book, a cultural heritage collectible item - Khatyn by Ales Adamovich, a classical Belorussian author who fought as a partisan during the WWII.”
EYES IN MAGAZINE


Readers on Goodreads.com say:

Steve:
“Khatyn describes the genocide of Byelorussians in WW II, but as its author intended, it has universal meaning. Although it is fictional, it is very well researched and will be a valuable resource for anyone interested in WW II history.”

Crystal: “This book will make you think about things differently. It was a lot to take in and was emotional for me to read. If you like reading about WW2 and or history you will enjoy this book.”

Amanda: “Wow this book is a must read... It's a book that will make you look at the world differently. At times it was difficult to read because we don't want to feel or know others suffering but through this I have a different understanding of war and the feelings and emotions that we in this day and age don't understand.”

Other publications:  

PEOPLES DAILY


About Ales Adamovich:

“…A decent and honest man, popular with his colleagues at the Cinema Institute in Moscow, for his last six years he was at the centre of Moscow's political and cultural life.”
THE INDEPENDENT

About the movie Come and See based on the story of Khatyn:

“ The history is harrowing and the presentation is graphic; you feel it through your body as villagers are packed into a barn to be incinerated.”
THE NEW YORK TIMES

“Both exhilarating and exhausting, Come and See is not just a great war film, but a great piece of cinema per se.”
STRANGE THINGS ARE HAPPENING

Khatyn in Belarusian media:
NASHA NIVA

 
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